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Colorado students charged for alleged prescription drugs sale

Posted on May 15, 2014

During exam times, many students can begin to feel stressed about having enough time to study for their tests. In some cases, individuals may go to extreme measures to stay awake, including taking prescription drugs that do not belong to them. If this takes place, those parties who have purchased and those who are selling the drugs could face serious charges.

It was recently reported that two students at the University of Colorado were taken into custody for allegedly selling Adderall on campus. It was also reported that one of the male suspects was purportedly selling the pills for $4 each, while the second male suspect was charging $5 each. Authorities stated that the drugs were allegedly sold in order for other students to be able to stay more focused while studying.

At this time, the two young men are facing felony charges. It was not disclosed how authorities became alerted to the situation on campus. It was also not mentioned what type of evidence may have been gathered against the young men in relation to this purported event.

While many individuals may make unwise decisions during their years at college, some of the consequences of those decisions can have greater impacts than others. Facing felony charges for the sale of prescription drugs can have considerably detrimental impacts on the future of these young men. As a result, they may wish to put their best foot forward while attempting to determine their actions for handling their case. Exploring their legal options in Colorado may allow them to choose the path that they each feel will have the best possible outcome.

Source: kwgn.com, “Two CU students charged with selling Adderall on campus“, Chuck Hickey, May 1, 2014

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