Free Consultation (970) 453-5533

Defending against Colorado DUI charges

Posted on April 16, 2015

Anyone who has been arrested on DUI charges will tell you that the process of getting arrested can be frightening, particularly for those who have never been taken into custody before. Even more frightening than being arrested, though, are the potential consequences associated with a DUI conviction. For some, those consequences are far worse than others.

Colorado residents who work in a public capacity — like as a police officer, a firefighter, a public official or a schoolteacher — might lose their job immediately following a DUI arrest. If they do not lose their job immediately following the arrest, though, they will likely lose it following a conviction. However, even for those who do not work in a public capacity, if the DUI conviction results in a license suspension, it could make one’s morning commute a lot more complicated. The social consequences of a DUI arrest can also serious when family members and friends judge an individual harshly for the behavior.

At the Law Offices of J.B. Katz, PC, we know that one DUI conviction might make or break an individual’s career. Getting one’s charges dropped or dismissed may not always be possible, but we have extensive experience representing those accused of DUI and defending them against conviction. If there is a strong chance of obtaining a verdict of not guilty in your case, we will be frank with you about your rights and the defense options available.

Most importantly, we do not charge potential new clients for their initial consultations. We are happy to listen to your story and let you know what your best next steps should be.

Search for:

Recent Posts

Archives

ArchivesSelect Month May 2022  (3) April 2022  (3) March 2022  (3) February 2022  (3) January 2022  (3) December 2021  (4) November 2021  (2) October 2021  (4) September 2021  (3) August 2021  (3) July 2021  (4) June 2021  (6) May 2021  (1) April 2021  (3) March 2021  (4) February 2021  (3) January 2021  (3) December 2020  (3) November 2020  (3) October 2020  (2) September 2020  (4) August 2020  (3) July 2020  (4) June 2020  (2) May 2020  (3) April 2020  (3) March 2020  (5) February 2020  (3) January 2020  (4) December 2019  (4) November 2019  (2) October 2019  (5) September 2019  (1) August 2019  (3) July 2019  (3) June 2019  (4) May 2019  (7) April 2019  (7) March 2019  (7) February 2019  (5) January 2019  (8) December 2018  (6) November 2018  (6) October 2018  (7) September 2018  (6) August 2018  (7) July 2018  (7) June 2018  (7) May 2018  (6) April 2018  (7) March 2018  (5) February 2018  (1) January 2018  (2) December 2017  (1) November 2017  (2) October 2017  (1) September 2017  (2) July 2017  (3) May 2017  (3) April 2017  (1) March 2017  (1) February 2017  (2) January 2017  (1) December 2016  (2) November 2016  (3) August 2016  (3) July 2016  (4) June 2016  (5) May 2016  (4) April 2016  (5) March 2016  (4) February 2016  (4) January 2016  (4) December 2015  (4) November 2015  (5) October 2015  (4) September 2015  (5) August 2015  (4) July 2015  (4) June 2015  (5) May 2015  (4) April 2015  (5) March 2015  (4) February 2015  (4) January 2015  (4) December 2014  (5) November 2014  (5) October 2014  (4) September 2014  (5) August 2014  (3) July 2014  (5) June 2014  (4) May 2014  (4) April 2014  (5) March 2014  (4) February 2014  (4) January 2014  (5) December 2013  (4) November 2013  (5) October 2013  (3) September 2013  (4) August 2013  (4) July 2013  (5) June 2013  (4) May 2013  (4) April 2013  (5) March 2013  (4) February 2013  (4) January 2013  (5) December 2012  (5) November 2012  (2)

Categories

RSS Feed

Subscribe To This Blog’s Feed

FindLaw Network