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Fight back against domestic violence charges in Colorado

Posted on September 2, 2015

Have you been accused of domestic violence? If you have, then you probably already know that Colorado is a mandatory arrest state. When the police arrived to your home for a dispute and see that you and your partner are romantically involved and have had an altercation of some kind, then it’s an obligation that at least one of you must be arrested. If it’s you, then from that moment forward, you need to protect yourself against these charges and unfair treatment.

Interestingly, even acts of mischief can be considered domestic violence, because the law doesn’t actually require violence to be involved at all. It’s simply your relationship that matters. The worst part of this is that police can get the situation wrong, putting you in jail to be held without bond until you can see a judge. In some cases, you could be waiting an entire weekend or over a holiday without being able to see the judge, leaving you to sit in jail for a crime you may not have committed.

Mandatory arrests come with an automatic protective order. As the person accused of an arrest, that means that you won’t be able to go back to the home where the alleged victim is. If that is your property, it still doesn’t matter. That very law could leave you homeless while you sort out how to deal with your charges and situation.

When the protective order is issued, you’re left waiting for the end of your case before it will be reviewed and dropped or kept. If the case doesn’t go through the court for months, then you’ll be waiting that long to sort out your home situation. Our website has more information on this kind of situation on our domestic violence webpage.

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