If you get charged and convicted of driving under the influence, it’s more than just your reputation at stake. Being stopped for a DUI, even if no victims are involved, can change many things in your life. For instance, your insurance rates may sky rocket and you may have trouble getting coverage.

To help prevent these kinds of issues, it’s important to defend yourself against the charges from the moment you’re suspected. You don’t have to speak to police without your attorney present. Your attorney can help you make a case against the charges, so you can try to have the DUI charge dropped or the penalties lowered.

Since you could be considered a high-risk driver after a DUI, insurance providers may charge you heavily for insurance. You’ll likely pay high auto insurance premiums and may be dropped from your current plan.

Once you’re convicted of a DUI, it’s likely that you’ll have to file a form called Form SR-22. This is an insurance document that proves to the Department of Motor Vehicles that you cover liability insurance. If your license has been suspended, this document is required before you can get your license back. Only six states don’t require the forms; they are Delaware, Minnesota, Kentucky, New Mexico, Pennsylvania and Oklahoma.

Will your plan automatically get canceled or force you to pay higher premiums? Not necessarily. Your insurance provider looks at each case individually, so you may be able to show that you have a history of good driving and that this is your first offense, or you may be able to provide other information to reduce your penalties.

Source: FindLaw, “DUI and Insurance: Rates and Form SR-22,” accessed Feb. 01, 2016