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Cocaine laws are strict in Colorado; defend yourself

Posted on April 28, 2016

In Colorado, marijuana has been made legal to use and sell in certain circumstances, but that doesn’t mean that other drug abuse is overlooked. In fact, cocaine laws in the state are still strict, because the use of cocaine is still a serious problem. Compared to the rest of the United States, Colorado’s cocaine use is higher than average.

What are the penalties if you’re caught with cocaine or are accused of selling it? Cocaine is a schedule 1 narcotic, so that means that you can face up to 12 years in prison and a $750,000 fine for selling it. Even the possession of cocaine can lead to six years in prison and $500,000 in fines.

Of course, the penalty you receive if convicted does depend on the amount of the substance you have in your possession or were trying to sell. There are other factors, too, like how close you were to a school or public property when the sale took place, if you were selling.

Possession is slightly less serious than selling cocaine, but there is a minimum prison term of five years for the sale of cocaine near a school. Subsequent offenses are much higher, with a minimum term of 20 years.

Federal laws may also affect your case, so state laws aren’t the only thing to be concerned about. If you’ve been accused of selling or possessing cocaine, now’s the time to make sure you defend yourself. Our website has more information on the steps you should take to help protect yourself during this difficult time in your life.

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