Let’s say you spent the evening enjoying the company of good friends at one of your favorite local Colorado restaurants. It was one of those places that has televisions hanging throughout the room, which made it easy for you to socialize and follow the NFL game on TV. You were having a great time and decided to order a couple of beers during your meal. You know you have a high tolerance for alcohol, so you didn’t really think there would be a problem if you drove home later.

You stayed at the restaurant several hours after you consumed the second beer and drank copious amounts of coffee within that time. You were confident of your ability to safely operate a motor vehicle. Since your home is located only about 10 minutes from your party location, you knew you would not be behind the wheel for any great length of time. This is where blood alcohol content level comes in since two beers for one motorist may be fine while posing a serious legal problem for another.

Alcohol affects individual bodies differently

With regard to possible intoxication, which Colorado law defines as a blood alcohol content of .08 for determining legal operation of a motor vehicle, it’s not so much about the amount of alcohol you consumed, but it is more about how that alcohol affected your particular body. The following list provides information explaining why alcohol affects different people in different ways:

  • Your body weight is a significant factor in determining how alcohol might affect you. This is mainly because body weight is also an indicator of how much water is in your system. Water dilutes alcohol. Water also distributes alcohol through your system. More body weight typically means more water, which typically means more alcohol dilution as it travels through your system.
  • To the contrary, less body weight means there is likely to be a higher concentration of alcohol in your system. This is why two people can each drink two beers but experience different effects.
  • Not only physical measurements, but whether you had anything to eat or drink besides alcohol also impacts how it affects your system.

In short, you can’t really assume that just because you only had two beers (or even one, for that matter) you are legally “good to go” to drive. A police officer who pulls you over in a traffic stop might have a very different take on the matter. That could bump your nice evening out with friends to a whole new level, one that includes criminal charges for DUI.

Many Colorado motorists have experienced this type of situation. Some have been able to avoid conviction by asking experienced defense attorneys to represent them in court.